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YOUR DONATION IS TAX DEDUCTIBLE

We take no money for our services from clients or caregivers.  We support our office, trainings, and all aspects of our work through donations, grants and fundraising.

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COMING HOME CONNECTION

Design Center Santa Fe

418 Cerrillos Rd #27

Santa Fe, NM 87501

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YOUR DONATION IS TAX DEDUCTIBLE

A truly stabilizing form of donation which helps us plan our services.

In Memory Of

& In Honor Of

Donations can be made to honor someone loved and respected, or in memory of someone in your life who has passed away.

THE GLENYS CARL LEGACY CIRCLE

A planned gift in the form of a bequest may be the single largest donation you make to a charity. These legacy donations are fundamental to the stability and ongoing existence of CHC, and help us make a sustained difference in the community. If you are thinking about remembering CHC in your will and would like to request an information packet or to speak with someone about making a bequest, please call the office: (505) 988 2468. Join the Glenys Carl Legacy Circle today, and make your gift a lasting one.

Donate Equipment to be Loaned

A free service, loaning out medical equipment such as wheel chairs, transfer chairs, walkers, disposable underwear, surgical gloves and other items when they no longer need them. This service relies on donations of equipment from former clients and the public, so we cannot guarantee what’s available, but each year we loan, or in the case of disposable products give away, hundreds of items.

 

All services start with a call to the office: (505) 988 2468.

VOLUNTEER

Volunteering is the HEART of CHC. Every caregiver, even if they take paid cases, also volunteers because we believe in giving back to our community and because we enjoy it. This is the way we help those who otherwise have no one to turn to.  All of our volunteers receive the same training, and attend to the same types of ailments that paid caregivers do.  Volunteering can be done in the way that it suits you:  your schedule, your abilities, your skills and abilities.

Demographics make it obvious that more and more people aging are going to be needing more help, and many will not have money to pay.  If you are young, volunteering is a great way to personal growth, learning skills, building your professional credibility, and expressing your values.  If you have your own limitations, volunteering can be a way to remember that there is still a lot you have to offer (maybe you cannot lift someone, but you can still give them a ride).  If you are retired, volunteering is a great way to give what you may one day need yourself.  If you are busy, volunteering is a good way to change focus and get your mind off your own business.  Volunteers are needed in all types: men, women, people of all ages, people with all types of interests and enthusiasms.  CHC is part of a growing volunteer culture that finds volunteering can be a new social network based on values: generosity, good will, sacrifice, commonalities among people, and many others.

 

At CHC we support the high standards of our caregiving services through trainings.  All our caregivers, paid or volunteer, receive the same training.  The initial training required gives new caregivers basic skills, and is also a way to know us better, and for us to know them before placement.  Ongoing trainings offer more depth in certain areas, such as dementia, or Parkinson's, or dealing with infectious disease.   Trainings are a way for caregivers to know each other, too, and to share experience.  Trainings are one way we care for our caregivers.

Caregivers’ Stories koyoko's story

Kayoko Omori is a former teacher who realized that her children are almost grown, and wanted to “have something of my own” through service to the community.  She began as a Coming Home Connections caregiver several years ago, and after a four-year hiatus, returned in the fall of 2017 with a renewed sense of purpose and a “beginner’s mind”.“  Kayoko declares, “I show up with a willingness to learn. It’s exciting to find there are multiple levels of caregiving, and that there are different types of caregivers. For me, it feels like a calling, a form of spiritual practice.”

 

She adds: “Often, caregivers are those that had life-changing, deeply personal experiences, who somehow learned to have an open heart. Of course, it isn’t always easy to feel comfortable and be present with people who are suffering, in pain…but then,” she adds, “I notice that discomfort in myself, not try to suppress or amplify it, then sort of allow for a prayerful opportunity to be there...with whatever “it” is that may be here.”  This inner practice is simple, yet profound: “just breathing and letting go within me, within this person in front of me, this family, then people everywhere who are feeling similar difficulty and discomfort at this very moment”.

 

Kayoko also empathizes with the clients’ family and loved ones. They often struggle with the process, and may be burned out, confused, in denial, etc.. She suspects that some of their very struggle is due to how little they are able to acknowledge exactly what they are going through. “Caregivers have a role in providing this fearless, compassionate space, where these complex feelings can show up, be felt, and named. Just the awareness of ‘You are not alone’ .. that is huge, and so sane-making.”

 

For Kayoko, the Coming Home Connections is a vibrant community. The support she feels from staff, she says, is tremendous. “CHC is a cutting-edge, grass-roots resource center, for both caregivers and families in need. So if a staff member feels I am a good fit with a client, then I trust their recommendation. I show up with a beginner’s mindset, willing to share some kind of goodness.”

barron's story

Barron Preuss recently moved to Santa Fe and is now a student pursuing a Bachelors of Science in Nursing at Santa Fe Community College. “With admiration of Upaya Zen Center’s Being With Dying program I felt an invisible hand pushing me towards hospice work and I knew that I wanted to be of service to the community, working with the elderly,” he says.  “I went to Coming Home Connections caregiver training and felt at home!  It was nice to meet others like me, a community of people who are excited to learn about caregiving.”  He is finding that each moment he spends with clients is extremely precious, and that he is learning so much every day as a result.

marta's story

Marta Harrison is a teacher who worked for many years in home care, assisted living and elder day care, and appreciates the many stories her clients tell.  “Women are living in their nineties and wow!  They are inspiring and I enjoy learning what is meaningful to them.  I recently worked with a woman to make sure she and the animals in her house were safe.  There was a sweetness about her and the hours just flew by.  I find it satisfying that I can be myself with many different people.  I put in a few words here and there to help others look at life more positively.”

 

Regarding Marta’s perspective of the difference that Coming Home Connections makes:

“I think the staff really pays attention to the aptitude and personality of each caregiver; they are very good at pairing caregivers with the people who need us.  I think that effort is amazing, and that the staff cares.  The organization is small enough that they can take the time to get to know us, and they have a deep respect for what each of us can give.”

Alison's story

Alison Smith began working as a caregiver over a decade ago, and “enjoys volunteering because I’m helping people who wouldn’t have this care otherwise.”  A psychotherapist by training, she knows how to “read” home health care environments, and says, “In every house I enter, it’s about the client.  One has to have a strong constitution, and to be a chameleon in working with a wide variety of clients and their families.”

 

She states, “The value of working with Coming Home Connection is that the staff coordinates the assessment with the client, family, and associated costs of care.  I know that they’ll put a great team together and that’s a big relief for me.”

 

As with many other caregivers, Alison values her autonomy, not having to clock into a cubicle for a 9:00 am to 5:00 pm job with a lunch break.  “It’s very intimate work, and that’s important to me.  My job is to help people who are not in a good time and place in their lives -- I don’t get to see the lovely people they used to be -- and that can be quite challenging.   I feel totally emotionally bound to the family as I try to help them through these difficult periods, working with their loved ones in ways that family members can’t or won’t.”

 

She adds, “It’s a job that you really need to care about people and intrinsically know the value of the service you provide, as acknowledgement is not usually top of mind for a person whose physical and/or mental health may be changing.  Although it’s work that by definition is isolating, we caregivers have kindred spirits, so although I may only see a coworker for ten minutes once a day during change of shift, we get it!”

get started

Contact our volunteer coordinator to inquire about volunteer opportunities at:

info@cominghomeconnection.org

(505) 988-2468

 

Please fill out our online volunteer form.

info@cominghomeconnection.org

Call (505) 988 2468

Fax (505) 988 2595

COMING HOME CONNECTION

Design Center Santa Fe

418 Cerrillos Rd #27

Santa Fe, NM 87501

© 2018 Coming Home Connection. All rights reserved.

Coming Home Connection  is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization. Your gift is tax-deductible to the full extent of the law

Get Involved
Donate
THE GLENYS CARL LEGACY CIRCLE
THE GLENYS CARL LEGACY CIRCLE
Donate Equipment to be Loaned
VOLUNTEER
Caregivers’ Stories koyoko's story
barron's story
marta's story
Alison's story

Alison Smith began working as a caregiver over a decade ago, and “enjoys volunteering because I’m helping people who wouldn’t have this care otherwise.”  A psychotherapist by training, she knows how to “read” home health care environments, and says, “In every house I enter, it’s about the client.  One has to have a strong constitution, and to be a chameleon in working with a wide variety of clients and their families.”

 

She states, “The value of working with Coming Home Connection is that the staff coordinates the assessment with the client, family, and associated costs of care.  I know that they’ll put a great team together and that’s a big relief for me.”

 

As with many other caregivers, Alison values her autonomy, not having to clock into a cubicle for a 9:00 am to 5:00 pm job with a lunch break.  “It’s very intimate work, and that’s important to me.  My job is to help people who are not in a good time and place in their lives -- I don’t get to see the lovely people they used to be -- and that can be quite challenging.   I feel totally emotionally bound to the family as I try to help them through these difficult periods, working with their loved ones in ways that family members can’t or won’t.”

 

She adds, “It’s a job that you really need to care about people and intrinsically know the value of the service you provide, as acknowledgement is not usually top of mind for a person whose physical and/or mental health may be changing.  Although it’s work that by definition is isolating, we caregivers have kindred spirits, so although I may only see a coworker for ten minutes once a day during change of shift, we get it!”

get started
Get Involved
Donate
THE GLENYS CARL LEGACY CIRCLE
Donate Equipment to be Loaned
VOLUNTEER
Caregivers’ Stories koyoko's story
barron's story
marta's story
Alison's story

Alison Smith began working as a caregiver over a decade ago, and “enjoys volunteering because I’m helping people who wouldn’t have this care otherwise.”  A psychotherapist by training, she knows how to “read” home health care environments, and says, “In every house I enter, it’s about the client.  One has to have a strong constitution, and to be a chameleon in working with a wide variety of clients and their families.”

 

She states, “The value of working with Coming Home Connection is that the staff coordinates the assessment with the client, family, and associated costs of care.  I know that they’ll put a great team together and that’s a big relief for me.”

 

As with many other caregivers, Alison values her autonomy, not having to clock into a cubicle for a 9:00 am to 5:00 pm job with a lunch break.  “It’s very intimate work, and that’s important to me.  My job is to help people who are not in a good time and place in their lives -- I don’t get to see the lovely people they used to be -- and that can be quite challenging.   I feel totally emotionally bound to the family as I try to help them through these difficult periods, working with their loved ones in ways that family members can’t or won’t.”

 

She adds, “It’s a job that you really need to care about people and intrinsically know the value of the service you provide, as acknowledgement is not usually top of mind for a person whose physical and/or mental health may be changing.  Although it’s work that by definition is isolating, we caregivers have kindred spirits, so although I may only see a coworker for ten minutes once a day during change of shift, we get it!”

get started